How do I know the gender of the fetus in the seventh month?

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 How do I know the gender of the fetus in the seventh month?


How do I know the gender of the fetus in the seventh month


The sex of the fetus is usually known at week 14 by determining the fetus's genitals by ultrasound, but this method is not considered completely accurate until 18 weeks, so it is usually recommended between 18-22 weeks.


However, sometimes due to the position of the fetus, the doctor cannot tell the gender of the child through ultrasound, which makes it difficult to determine the gender of the child by knowing the nature of the genitals, so it may be necessary to check the gender of the fetus in the month VII.

Fetal sex check during the seventh month


If it is not possible to determine the sex of the previous fetus due to the position of the fetus, the sex of the fetus can be determined by ultrasound at 7 months of pregnancy. Candy, chocolate, and other sugar-laden fruits, as well as making noise, plus some exercise. 


The doctor can also adjust the position of the fetus to determine its gender if the previous methods are not feasible so that he can use the ultrasound to detect the fetus’s genitals. 

Some common myths about determining the sex of the fetus


Many myths are said to be circulating among people that help determine the sex of the fetus, but these myths are not believed to be true, even in rare cases where the sex of the fetus is as expected. Perhaps the most famous of these myths are the following: 

Find out the gender of the fetus by heart rate


Legend has it that if a fetus's heart rate exceeds 140 beats per minute (BPM), the fetus is female, and if it is below this value, the fetus is male. 140 and 170 bpm weekly for males and females, respectively, during nine pregnancies.

Knowing the gender of the fetus from the nature of the dream


Perhaps one of the oldest myths about the sex of the fetus, it is said that sweet-toothed women during pregnancy give birth to girls and women who eat salty food will give birth to boys, and there is no scientific evidence for this myth. Instead, the cause and nature of the cravings are attributed to factors such as hormonal changes during pregnancy.